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Phrasal verbs

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If you are not familiar with "phrasal verbs", we suggest you to first look at the lesson Phrasal and Prepositional Verbs .

In addition to the definition in English, translation in Spanish and an example, here you will find information on syntax (see below for an explanation), if there are any existing derivatives, synonyms, antonyms, use notes and whether the verb is used more often in American or British English (US/UK).

Note on syntax: Phrasal verbs can be intransitive, inseparable or separable.

intransitive: these verbs do not take an object (ex. The car broke down yesterday.)

inseparable: the object must come after the phrasal verb (ex. I'm too busy to deal with the client right now.)

separable: the object must come after the phrasal verb (ex. The waiter added the bill up. or The waiter added up the bill.)

There are thousands of phrasal verbs in English and while the following list is extensive, it does not include all existing phrasal verbs. Those phrasal verbs which are featured are among the most commonly used.


to add up
1.1
to total (mathematically)
The waiter added up the bill.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to satisfactorily explain something; to make sense
Parts of the story just don't add up.
Syntax: intransitive

to ask for
1.1
to request
Can I ask you for a favor?
Syntax: separable

1.2
to seek or provoke something negative
If you date him, you're asking for trouble.
Syntax: inseparable

to belong to
1.1
to be connected with something or someone
This isn't my car, it belongs to my mom.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to be a member of
John has been a member of the Nautical Club for ten years.
Syntax: inseparable

to bend down
1.1
to lower the top half of your body
She bent down and picked up her scarf which had fallen on the floor.
Syntax: intransitive

to bend over
1.1
to lower the top half of your body by inclining it forward
We have to bend over and touch our toes a lot in yoga class.
Syntax: intransitive

to blow up
1.1
to explode
They blew up a building, but luckily nobody was hurt.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to explode

1.2
to inflate
I have to blow up the tires on my bike if I want to ride it.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to inflate

1.3
to enlarge
Can you blow up the photo so we can see it better?
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to enlarge

to break down
1.1
to stop working; functioning
Our car broke down while we were driving to the supermarket.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to end negotiations unsuccessfully
After days of negotiations, the talks broke down.
Syntax: intransitive

1.3
to remove or dismount
The firemen had to break down the door to get into the house.
Syntax: separable

1.4
to start crying
It was the most stressful week. By Friday I broke down and cried.
Syntax: intransitive

to bring up
1.1
to raise a child
I was brought up by my grandmother.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to raise

1.2
to mention
I hate him. Don't ever bring his name up again!
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to raise

to call back
1.1
return a phone call
He was busy when I called, but he said he would call me back tonight.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to phone back or to ring back

to call off
1.1
to cancel
Did you hear? Brenda called off the wedding!
Syntax: separable

to catch up
1.1
to bring or get up to date
Call me, we need to catch up!
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to bring up to date

1.2
to reach someone or something ahead of you
You are walking so fast, I will never catch up with you.
Syntax: separable

to cheer up
1.1
to encourage; to brighten up; to be less unhappy
Cheer up! Tomorrow is a new day.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to brighten up

to chill out
1.1
to relax
I'm tired. Let's just stay in and chill out.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to relax

to come back
1.1
to return
We are coming back from vacation next week.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to return

to deal with
1.1
to attend to; to treat; to handle
Can you deal with this customer while I have my lunch?
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to handle

1.2
to handle
Bob, this is your problem, you need to deal with it.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to handle; to cope

to fall apart
1.1
to break into pieces; to disintegrate
The sweater just fell apart after so many washings.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to come apart

1.2
to fail
The negotiations fell apart after you left the meeting.
Syntax: intransitive

1.3
to lose emotional control; to become very upset
She fell apart when she heard the terrible news.
Syntax: intransitive

to find out
1.1
to discover; to learn
Did you find out what happened to Joe?
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to discover

to get along \ on
1.1
to have a good relationship with someone
I'm so lucky, my father and my husband get along/on really well.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to make progress; to deal or to handle
How are you getting along at university?
Syntax: intransitive

to get away
1.1
to go on holiday or for a short break
Work has been so stressful, I need to get away!
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to leave or to move
Paul didn't come to the party because he couldn't get away from work.
Syntax: intransitive

1.3
to escape
You're too late, the thief got away.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to escape

to get back
1.1
to return
They get back from vacation on Thursday.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to return something; to recuperate or recover
If it doesn't work, can I return it and get my money back?
Syntax: separable

1.3
to move away
Get back or you will burn yourself.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to stand back

to get back (at)
1.1
to take revenge; to avenge
I know you are angry, but getting back at him won't help you feel better.
Syntax: inseparable

to get by (with \ on)
1.1
to manage with few resources or little money; to survive
We don't have a lot of money right now, but we'll get by.
Syntax: inseparable

to get in
1.1
to arrive
What time did you get in last night?
Syntax: intransitive

to get in (into)
1.1
to enter
Get in the car and I will take you to school.
Syntax: inseparable
Antonyms: to get out

1.2
to enter
You can't get into the club without a ticket.
Syntax: intransitive

1.3
to enter
Beatrice applied to many schools, but she only got into one.
Syntax: intransitive

to get into
1.1
to enter
I got into bed because I was sick.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to get out of

1.2
to become involved or interested in something
I have been getting into modern dance lately.
Syntax: inseparable

to get off
1.1
to exit or leave
We must get off the train at the next stop.
Syntax: inseparable
Antonyms: to get on

1.2
to finish or leave
We usually get off early on Fridays in the summer.
Syntax: intransitive

to get on
1.1
to continue
My husband and I have separated, but I must get on with my life.
Syntax: intransitive

to get on (onto)
1.1
to enter or to board
He got on the bus for the airport.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to board
Antonyms: to get off

to get out (of)
1.1
to leave or exit
It's too smoky, I have to get out of here.
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to get in (into)

1.2
to leave or exit
He got out of the car quickly.
Syntax: inseparable
Antonyms: to get in (into)

1.3
to avoid doing something
How can I get out of going to work today?
Syntax: inseparable

1.4
to remove
I tried, but I can't get the stain out of my new dress.
Syntax: separable

to get over
1.1
to recover; to recuperate
She's still very upset. She can't get over not having been accepted to the university.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to overcome

to get through
1.1
to finish
I'm never going to get through this book with all of these distractions!
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to manage or deal with difficulties
These are difficult times, but we'll get through.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to survive

1.3
to pass or be accepted (laws, proposals, etc.)
The bill just barely got through Congress.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to pass

1.4
to contact or communicate
I have been calling her all morning, but I can't get through.
Syntax: intransitive

to get to
1.1
to arrive
What time does the train get to Madrid?
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to arrive

1.2
to start to do something
When are you going to get to your homework?
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to get around to

to get together
1.1
to meet, in a social sense
We are getting together for dinner tomorrow at 8.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to meet up

to get up
1.1
to get out of (leave) bed
What time did you get up this morning?
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to rise to one's feet
What are you doing on the floor? Get up!
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to get down

to give away
1.1
to give something without asking for or expecting payment or to distribute something for free
The millionaire gave away all his money just before he died.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to tell a secret or reveal information
Helen won't give away her recipe for chocolate cake. It's a family secret.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to betray; to reveal

to give back
1.1
to return something
Can you give me back my book when you have finished reading it?
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to return; to had back

to give in \ up
1.1
to surrender, accept defeat, stop trying
Be strong! Don't give in to temptation.
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to hold out

to give out
1.1
to distribute; to emit
They are giving out free samples at the store.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to hand out

1.2
to stop working, to have no more of a supply of something
My refrigerator finally gave out. I had it for over 20 years, so I can't complain.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to run out

to give up
1.1
to stop doing something
Nicolas gave up smoking over 10 years ago.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to abandon

to go ahead
1.1
to proceed
The project is going ahead as planned.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to proceed

1.2
to proceed
Go ahead, I will meet you at the restaurant.
Syntax: intransitive

to go away
1.1
to leave or to travel
We are going away for the weekend.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to disappear
The smell of the fire still hasn't gone away.
Syntax: intransitive

to go back
1.1
to return
I'm so embarassed. I can never go back to that bar again.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to date to an early time, to have a long history
This story goes back to when I was young.
Syntax: intransitive

to go back on
1.1
to break a promise
He said he would never leave, but he went back on his promise.
Syntax: inseparable

to go by
1.1
the passing of time
Why does the time go by so quickly when you are having fun?
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to pass by

1.2
to base, trust or depend on correct information
According to my mother, if there is one rule to go by, it is to never say 'no' to a free meal.
Syntax: inseparable

to go down
1.1
to descend
Can you go down and see who is at the door?
Syntax: inseparable
Antonyms: to go up

1.2
to decrease; to get smaller
The price of gas has gone down in the last few days.
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to go up

1.3
sunset
The sun goes down around 6.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to set
Antonyms: to come up; to rise

1.4
to happen; to take place
What went down at the party last night? I heard there was a fight.
Syntax: intransitive

to go in
1.1
to enter
Jane went in to the store to buy some milk.
Syntax: inseparable

to go into
1.1
to discuss in detail
Trust me, I will bore you if I go into details.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to enter a profession
My daughter is going into medicine.
Syntax: inseparable

1.3
to dedicate or devote; to invest
A lot of time and effort went into this project.
Syntax: inseparable

to go off
1.1
to leave
Before you go off, can you close all the windows?
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to explode
A bomb went off in the train station.
Syntax: intransitive

1.3
to stop working [electricity]
The christmas tree lights go off at midnight.
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to go on; to come on

1.4
to sound, start ringing [alarm]
My alarm clock went off too early this morning.
Syntax: intransitive

1.5
to take place
The party went off well.
Syntax: intransitive

to go on
1.1
to continue
It will be difficult with only 10 players, but the game must go on.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to carry on

1.2
to last
The concert went on for 3 hours. I thought it would never end.
Syntax: inseparable

1.3
to start working [electricity]
The Christmas tree lights go on at 7.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to come on
Antonyms: to go off

1.4
to happen
What's going on?
Syntax: intransitive

to go out
1.1
to leave
Let's go out and play in the snow!
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to go in

1.2
to be sent
Has the mail gone out yet?
Syntax: intransitive

1.3
to be transmitted
The news went out last night.
Syntax: intransitive

1.4
to be extinguished; to stop working
The lights went out during the storm.
Syntax: intransitive

1.5
to become unfashionable
Mini skirts went out of style last year.
Syntax: intransitive

to go out with
1.1
to date, to have a relationship with
I hear Michael is going out with Jane.
Syntax: inseparable

to go over
1.1
to review or revise
Before you submit your thesis, I think we should go over it together.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to visit
I am going over to my friend's house later.
Syntax: intransitive

to go through
1.1
to pass from one point to another
You need to go through the Lincoln Tunnel to get to New Jersey.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to experience
I can't believe what you have been through.
Syntax: inseparable

1.3
to examine or review
I need to go through the report one more time.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to run through; to go over

1.4
to perform or carry something out (process)
Every student must go through the application process.
Syntax: inseparable

1.5
to consume or to spend
My son is working, but he goes through his money quickly.
Syntax: inseparable

to go up
1.1
to climb
Go up to your room and finish your homework.
Syntax: inseparable
Antonyms: to go down

1.2
to increase, rise or climb
The price of gas has gone up in the last few days.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to rise
Antonyms: to go down; to come down

1.3
to approach
She went up to the teacher to ask her a question.
Syntax: intransitive

1.4
to be built
There is a new building going up on our street.
Syntax: intransitive

to grow up
1.1
to mature, to become an adult
Alex grew up in France, but now he lives in Italy.
Syntax: intransitive

to hand in
1.1
to submit
All homework must be handed in by the end of the day.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to give in

to hand out
1.1
to distribute
The teacher will hand out the assignments this afternoon.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to give out

to hang on
1.1
to wait
Hang on, I'm coming.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to hold on

1.2
to hold on firmly
Hang on tight, the street is slippery from the ice.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to hold on

to hang onto \ on to
1.1
to keep
I would hang onto your receipts, just in case.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to hold onto

to hang out
1.1
to spend time in a social sense
Her favorite thing to do is hang out with her friends.
Syntax: intransitive

to hang up
1.1
to end a phone call
I was so angry I hung up on him.
Syntax: transitive
Sinonyms: to ring off (UK)

to have on
1.1
to be wearing
She had on a beautiful red dress.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to wear

1.2
to have something turned on
Sorry it's so hot in here, but I have had the oven on all morning.
Syntax: separable

to have over
1.1
to receive a guest
We are having some friends over for dinner.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to have around (UK)

to head out \ off
1.1
to go out; to leave
It's getting late. Shall we head out?
Syntax: intransitive
US/UK: US

to hear from
1.1
to receive communication or news from someone
Have you heard from your parents recently?
Syntax: inseparable

to hold back
1.1
to not express or show emotion
Don't hold back, tell me how you really feel.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to contain

to hold on
1.1
to wait
Hold on, I'm coming!
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to hang on

1.2
to hold firmly
Hold on tight, the street is slippery from the ice.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to hand on

to hold onto \ on to
1.1
to keep
I would hold onto your receipts, just in case.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to hang onto (on to)

to hold out
1.1
to resist
Can you hold out until I get back home?
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to last out
Antonyms: to give in

to hold up
1.1
to delay
The flight was held up because of the weather.
Syntax: separable

to hook up
1.1
to meet
We hooked up with some friends while we were on vacation.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to meet up
US/UK: US

1.2
to connect
My friend helped me hook up my new stereo.
Syntax: inseparable

to hop off
1.1
to exit or leave
The boy quickly hopped off the bus.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to get off
Antonyms: to hop on; to get on

to hop on
1.1
to enter or to board
Let's hop on the bus here.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to get on
Antonyms: to hop off; to get off

to hurry up
1.1
to rush
Hurry up or we will be late.
Syntax: separable

to keep away
1.1
to prevent someone or something from getting near
A net is the best thing to keep the mosquitoes away.
Syntax: separable

to keep down
1.1
to control; to maintain down
Keep your voice down, you'll wake up the children!
Syntax: separable

to keep from
1.1
to hide something
My boyfriend is acting strange. I think he is keeping something from me.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to refrain from doing something
Henry couldn't keep from laughing.
Syntax: inseparable

to keep in
1.1
to contain; to not allow out
Despite his efforts, Henry couldn't keep his laughter in.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to restrain

to keep out
1.1
to avoid
While you are taking antibiotics you must keep out of the sun.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to stay out

1.2
to not allow someone or something to enter
I closed the curtains to keep the sun out.
Syntax: separable

to keep to
1.1
to stay within limits, to adhere
Please stop improvising and keep to the script!
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to stick to

to keep up
1.1
to continue an action; to persist
Another excellent mark. Keep up the good work!
Syntax: separable

1.2
to maintain in good condition
I don't want a big house, it's too much to keep up.
Syntax: separable

1.3
to prevent from sleeping
The neighbor's noise kept me up all night.
Syntax: separable

to kick about \ around
1.1
We kicked some new marketing ideas around at the meeting this morning.
Syntax:

to kick back
1.1
to pay someone illegally
They kicked back a small percent to the commissioner for passing the bill.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to relax
You're on vacation…just kick back and relax!
Syntax: intransitive

to kick in
1.1
to start having an effect
I still have a headache, I don’t think the medicine has kicked in yet.
Syntax: intransitive

to kick off
1.1
to start
The game doesn't kick off until 8.
Syntax: intransitive

to kid around
1.1
to tease; to joke
Don't be so serious, I'm just kidding around!
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to mess around

to knock down
1.1
to cause someone/something to fall
The wind was so strong, it knocked down many trees on our street.
Syntax: separable

to knock it off
1.1
to stop doing something
Knock it off, you're driving me crazy.
Syntax: separable

to knock off
1.1
to finish work
He knocked off early to go to the football game.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to reduce price or amount of time
The waiter knocked off half the price because we had to wait so long for the food.
Syntax: separable

1.3
to create something quickly
She knocked off three articles in one day.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to knock out; to churn out

to knock out
1.1
to eliminate
We knocked our biggest competition out of the tournament.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to make someone unconscious or exhausted
He hit his head so hard, he was knocked out.
Syntax: separable

to laugh at
1.1
to ridicule; make fun of
All the kids were laughing at me!
Syntax: inseparable

to laugh off
1.1
to pretend something isn't important
Although she was embarrassed, she was still able to laugh it off.
Syntax: separable

to lay off
1.1
to stop doing something
Lay off your sister, she's had enough.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to make an employee redundant
With the crisis, we have been forced to lay off some staff.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to make redundant; to let go

to lay out
1.1
to design, compose
He laid out the web page perfectly. / He laid out his plans for the meeting.
Syntax: separable

to lead to
1.1
to result in
Smoking can lead to serious health problems.
Syntax: inseparable

to leave out
1.1
to exclude or omit
Nobody likes to be left out.
Syntax: separable

to let down
1.1
to disappoint
I don't want to let you down, but I don't think I can come with you to the party tomorrow.
Syntax: separable

to let in
1.1
to allow to enter
They wouldn't let my father in because he wasn't wearing a suit.
Syntax: separable

to let off
1.1
to not punish
The thief was let off without punishment.
Syntax: separable

to let out
1.1
to allow to leave, to make a noise or expression of emotion
He wouldn't let me out of the car until I apologized.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to hold in

to let up
1.1
to stop
When is this rain going to let up?
Syntax: inseparable

to lie about \ around
1.1
to be lazy or unproductive
The kids didn't do anything yesterday but lay about all day.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to laze about/around; to lounge about/around

to lie down
1.1
to rest
I'm exhausted, I'm going to lie down for a few minutes.
Syntax: intransitive

to lighten up
1.1
to be less serious; to relax
Lighten up, it was only a joke!
Syntax: separable

to line up
1.1
to arrange in a line or in a timeline
Before the new iphone was released, people were already lining up to buy it.
Syntax: separable

to live by
1.1
to follow a belief system or to be guided by
Those are words to live by!
Syntax: separable

to live down
1.1
to forget and stop being embarrassed by something
Will I ever live that mistake down!
Syntax: separable

to live off
1.1
to be financially supported
You need to get a job. You can't live off your parents forever.
Syntax: inseparable

to live on
1.1
to survive in a financial sense
Since my husband lost his job, we have been living on my salary alone.
Syntax: inseparable

to live out
1.1
to fulfill a dream or ambition
This is a dream that I must live out!
Syntax: separable

to live up to
1.1
to meet expectations
The restaurant didn't live up to their expectations.
Syntax: inseparable

to look after
1.1
to care for; to attend
My parents are looking after the children while we go to dinner.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to take care of

to look around \ round
1.1
to look about one's surroundings, without specific direction
I looked around, but nobody was there.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to glance about/around/round

to look at
1.1
to look in a specific direction or with intent
I want a doctor to look at that rash.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to examine

to look back
1.1
to think about the past; to remember
When I look back, I think my university years were the best of my life.
Syntax: intransitive

to look down on
1.1
to have a low opinion of something; to disapprove
He looks down on people who smoke.
Syntax: inseparable

to look for
1.1
to try to find, to search
Paul is looking for the document you requested.
Syntax: inseparable

to look forward to
1.1
to wait for or anticipate something pleasant
We are really looking forward to your visit!
Syntax: inseparable

to look into
1.1
to research or investigate
The police are looking into the cause of the accident.
Syntax: inseparable

to look on
1.1
to look or watch without intervening
How could they just look on and do nothing!
Syntax: intransitive

to look out
1.1
to be careful
Look out! That car almost hit you!
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to watch out

to look over \ through
1.1
to inspect; to examine; to review
The teacher looked over my essay before I submitted it.
Syntax: separable

to look up
1.1
to improve
My husband just got a promotion, so things are looking up.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to consult a reference book such as a dictionary or phonebook to find information
You will need to look up some words in the dictionary.
Syntax: separable

to look up to
1.1
to respect or admire
She's so brave, I have always looked up to her.
Syntax: inseparable

to loosen up
1.1
to relax; to become more relaxed; to not take so seriously
When I first met him he was a bit uptight, but he has loosened up a lot.
Syntax: intransitive

to make for
1.1
to go in a certain direction; to head
As soon as he saw me, he made for the door.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to produce a result or situation
His bad humor made for a very long and uncomfortable day.
Syntax: inseparable

to make into
1.1
to change or transform something
Since I left home, my parents made my bedroom into an office.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to turn into

to make of
1.1
to have an opinion
What do you make of that new Italian restaurant on the corner?
Syntax: inseparable

to make off
1.1
to leave in a rush
The thieves made off after they had taken everything of value.
Syntax: intransitive

to make out
1.1
to kiss
I don't like hanging out with John and Sue, they are always making out.
Syntax: intransitive
US/UK: US

1.2
to give an impression; to pretend
He makes out like he has a lot of money.
Syntax: inseparable

1.3
to understand
He's always so quiet. I don't know if he is shy, I just can't make him out!
Syntax: separable

1.4
to write or to write something in the name of someone
My father made out to me for my birthday.
Syntax: intransitive

1.5
to progress
How did you make out yesterday at the sales?
Syntax: intransitive

1.6
to distinguish; to discern
Can you make out that sign up ahead?
Syntax: separable

to make over
1.1
to change or transform appearance
We made my mom over for her 60th birthday.
Syntax: separable

to make up
1.1
to invent
That never happened! You're making it up!
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to reconcile
Our parents had an argument last night, but they made up this morning.
Syntax: intransitive

1.3
to consist of; to constitute
The committee is made up of several people from the community.
Syntax: inseparable

to make up (for)
1.1
to compensate
I'm really sorry. Please let me make it up to you.
Syntax: inseparable

to mess about \ around
1.1
to joke or tease; to not be serious or to treat someone badly
Don't take it so seriously, I'm just messing around with you.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to fool about/around

to mess up
1.1
to traumatize
All those years in the war really messed him up.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to make a mistake
You really messed up this time. She's never going to forgive you.
Syntax: separable
US/UK: US

1.3
to make something untidy
Mom! I just finished cleaning my room and Bobby came in and messed it all up again!
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to muck up; to foul up

to mess with
1.1
to provoke; to annoy or bother
Just ignore him, he's messing with you.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to alter; to try to change or improve, usually unsuccessfully
Who messed with the settings on my mobile?
Syntax: inseparable
US/UK: US

to mix in
1.1
to add or incorporate

Syntax:

to mix up
1.1
to confuse
As my father gets older he just gets more and more mixed up.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to muddle

to move ahead \ on
1.1
to continue; make progress
Despite the delay, construction is moving ahead as planned.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to proceed

to move away
1.1
to distance
It's always difficult for parents when their children move away from home.
Syntax: intransitive

to move back
1.1
to move in a backwards direction; to return to living somewhere
I don't think I could ever move back to New York.
Syntax: inseparable
Antonyms: to move forward

to move forward
1.1
to advance; to move in a forward motion
They have moved the date of the meeting up two days.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to move back

to move in \ into
1.1
to start living in a place
Her boyfriend moved in last week.
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to move out

to move out
1.1
to leave the place where one was living
We are moving out of this apartment next week and I can't wait!
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to move in

to move over
1.1
to change; to transfer; to move
The company is moving over to the new web platform later this year.
Syntax: separable

to move up
1.1
to move to a higher level
The song is moving up in the charts.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to go up
Antonyms: to move down; to go down

to nail down
1.1
to specify; to understand completely
We're trying to nail down a date for the meeting.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to pin down

to own up
1.1
to confess
Is anybody going to own up to this mistake?
Syntax: intransitive

to pack in
1.1
to attract crowds; to fill
The tour packed in the crowds in every city they played in.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to cram in

to pass away \ on
1.1
to die
Her grandfather passed away last year.
Syntax: intransitive

to pass by
1.1
to go past without stopping
The Carnival parade passes by my house every year.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to go by

1.2
to miss an opportunity
This is an incredible opportunity! We can't let it pass by!
Syntax: separable

1.3
to visit briefly
Pass by later and I can give you that money I owe you.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to drop by

to pass down
1.1
to transmit
This ring has been passed down from one woman to another in my family.
Syntax: separable

to pass off
1.1
to give the impression; to pretend or to convince
He tried to pass it off as a simple mistake.
Syntax: separable

to pass on
1.1
to transmit
I think my brother passed is flu on to me.
Syntax: separable

to pass out
1.1
to faint or lose consciousness
It hurt so much she passed out from the pain.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to black out

1.2
to distribute
The teacher passed out the assignment at the end of the class.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to hand out

to pass over
1.1
to ignore or to not give someone something
Dave has been passed over for a promotion for the last three years.
Syntax: separable

to pass up
1.1
to decline an opportunity
How could you pass up the chance to live abroad for a year!
Syntax: separable

to pay back
1.1
to return borrowed money; to repay
I'm not worried, I know you will pay me back when you can.
Syntax: payback [n.] (beneficio)

1.2
to take revenge
Are you going to pay him back for cheating on you?
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to get back at

to pay off
1.1
to succeed or produce a successful result
All your hard work paid off!
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to repay a debt completely
We will pay off our mortgage at the end of the year.
Syntax: separable

to perk up
1.1
to feel better, happier, with more energy
This vacation should help perk you up.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to liven up; to pick up

to pick on
1.1
to teas; to bother; to criticize or annoy
Stop picking on your brother!
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to get at

to pick out
1.1
to choose
Alice picked out the best looking apples and made a pie.
Syntax: separable

to pick up
1.1
to improve
Business is picking up at the shop this month.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to flirt
That's the girl John picked up at the bar last night.
Syntax: separable

1.3
to collect
We will pick you up at your house at 6.
Syntax: separable

1.4
to learn
He picks up languages easily.
Syntax: separable

to pick up on
1.1
to detect
The doctor didn't pick up on her symptoms.
Syntax: inseparable

to pig out
1.1
to eat large quantities
Whenever she's depressed she pigs out on sweets.
Syntax: intransitive

to piss off
1.1
to be angry or annoyed
What's wrong with Ben? Is he pissed off at you?
Syntax: separable

to plan on
1.1
to intend or expect to do something
We weren't planning on having to buy a new car this year, but our old one broke down.
Syntax: inseparable

to play along
1.1
to pretend to agree to something; to fake interest in something
I don't think it's a good idea, but I'll play along if you want.
Syntax: intransitive

to play down
1.1
to minimize the importance of something
The director is trying to play down the significance of the recent cutbacks.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to downplay
Antonyms: to play up

to play out
1.1
to continue or progress until the end
I don't know what will happen. Best we wait and let it play out.
Syntax: intransitive

to play up
1.1
to exaggerate; to give more importance to
You need to play up your skills if you want to get the job.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to overplay
Antonyms: to play down

to play with
1.1
to consider
The company is playing with the idea of expanding.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to toy with

to pour out
1.1
to leave or come out in large quantities
The crowds poured out onto the streets.
Syntax: intransitive

to pull ahead
1.1
to overtake; to move to the front
Hurry up, they're pulling ahead of us!
Syntax: intransitive

to pull apart
1.1
to separate or destroy
The police had to pull the two men apart.
Syntax: separable

to pull back
1.1
to move away or decide not to participate in something; to withdraw
On the day of the signing, the buyer pulled back.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to draw back; to pull out

to pull for
1.1
to support
Who are you pulling for in the match?
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to root for

to pull in \ into
1.1
to arrive
What time did the train pull in yesterday?
Syntax: intransitive

to pull off
1.1
to manage to do something
It was difficult but we pulled it off!
Syntax: separable

to pull out
1.1
to leave
The train pulled out of the station at 10.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to withdraw
She pulled her wallet out of her purse to pay the bill.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to take out

to pull over
1.1
to stop or make stop; to move to the side
The police pulled me over for driving too fast.
Syntax: separable

to pull through
1.1
to recover; to recuperate
My grandmother was so weak, we weren't sure she would pull through.
Syntax: intransitive

to put away
1.1
to put or place something in its place
Please put all your toys away. We have guests coming for dinner.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to keep out

to put back
1.1
to return something to its place; to replace
My sister is always borrowing my things and she never puts them back!
Syntax: separable

1.2
to postpone; to delay
The meeting has been put back to next month.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to move back; to set back
Antonyms: to bring forward; to put forward; to move forward

to put down
1.1
to stop holding; to put something in its place
You can put that box down in the corner.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to set down
Antonyms: to pick up

1.2
to humiliate; to speak badly of someone
Why are you always putting other people down?
Syntax: separable

to put in
1.1
to install
We are putting in a new air conditioning unit.
Syntax: separable

to put in \ into
1.1
to place; to move into
The man who robbed our house has been put in jail.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to include; to contribute
She has put a lot of time and energy into the project.
Syntax: separable

to put off
1.1
to postpone; to delay
You must not want to do it, you keep putting it off.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to not like; to stop liking
I was really put off by his attitude.
Syntax: separable

to put on
1.1
to dress; to start wearing something
Why don't you put on your green dress, it really suits you.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to take off

to put out
1.1
extinguish
Can you put out the light, I'm exhausted.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to turn off; to switch off

to put up
1.1
to mount; to hang; to raise; to place
The kids want to put up a tent in the backyard this summer.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to take down

to put up with
1.1
to tolerate
I don't know how you can put up with him. He drives me crazy!
Syntax: inseparable

to read into
1.1
to attribute or presume a different meaning than what was intended
I think your reading to much into it. He looked like he was just tired.
Syntax: separable

to read up on
1.1
to research
We've been reading up on business practices, as we want to open a company.
Syntax: inseparable

to roll back
1.1
to reduce or remove
All the stores of rolled back their prices for the end of season sales.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to bring down

to roll down
1.1
to lower
Can you roll down the car window? It's hot in here.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to roll up

to root for
1.1
to support
Which team are you rooting for?
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to cheer for

to rub in
1.1
to remind or emphasis how bad something was; to make someone feel bad
Yeah, you won. You don't have to keep rubbing it in!
Syntax: separable

to rule out
1.1
to exclude a possibility
It's not a bad idea. I wouldn't rule it out.
Syntax: separable

to run across \ into
1.1
to find or meet by accident
I ran across an article in the newspaper about your father's company.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to come across

to run after
1.1
to chase or pursue
The police chased after the thieves for over an hour.
Syntax: inseparable

to run along
1.1
to go away; to leave
Run along now, I'm working.
Syntax: intransitive

to run around \ about
1.1
to be busy doing many things
I need a nap. I've been running around all morning.
Syntax: intransitive

to run away \ off
1.1
to escape or leave
Their son ran away from home last week, but luckily the police have found him.
Syntax: intransitive

to run down
1.1
to hit someone with a vehicle
I was almost run down by a bus today on my way to work.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to knock down/over

1.2
to find
I was able to run down that part you need for your car.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to track down; to trace

1.3
to lose power or energy
Turn off the car or you are going to run down the battery.
Syntax: separable

to run into
1.1
to meet by accident
Did I tell you? I ran into your brother the other day at the cinema.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to bump into

1.2
to collide
Did you hear? Last night a car ran into the shop down the street.
Syntax: inseparable

to run into \ up against
1.1
to encounter
We ran into some problems with the neighbors recently.
Syntax: inseparable

to run off
1.1
to escape or leave; to go away
Her father ran off with another woman.
Syntax: inseparable

to run out (of)
1.1
to have nothing left, to expire
We have run out of materials. We need to go to the store.
Syntax: inseparable

to run over
1.1
to hit someone with a vehicle
The child was run over by a bus and killed.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to knock down/over

to run over \ through
1.1
to review or revise
Can you run over the script with me one last time?
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to go over; to run through

to run up
1.1
to spend a lot of money on credit
You need to stop spending so much money. You are running up a lot of debt.
Syntax: separable

to screw around
1.1
to waste time; to not be serious; to be playful
Stop screwing around, we have work to do!
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to mess around/about
US/UK: US

to screw over
1.1
to cheat or harm
Her ex-husband really screwed her over when he left her.
Syntax: separable

to screw up
1.1
to make a mistake; to do something badly; to fail
I think I really screwed up that last exam. I just hope I pass the course.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to mess up

to see about \ to
1.1
to arrange; to occupy one's self with something
I'll see about the options for you.
Syntax: inseparable

to see off
1.1
to say goodbye to someone
We are going to the airport to see them off.
Syntax: separable

to see out \ through
1.1
to last until the end
I know you are tired, but we have to see this project out.
Syntax: separable

to see through
1.1
to realize that someone is being deceitful; to see the truth behind a lie
I could see right through him. He was lying.
Syntax: inseparable

to sell out
1.1
to have nothing left; to sell everything in stock
The tickets were sold out by the time we arrived.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to lose integrity in exchange for financial gain
I never expected that they would sell themselves out like that.
Syntax: intransitive

to set about
1.1
to start doing something
She was bored so she set about cleaning the house.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to go about

to set apart
1.1
to distinguish; to be better or different than others
It's their teamwork that sets them apart.
Syntax: separable

to set aside
1.1
to separate or reserve something for later or for other purposes
You boys need to set aside your difference and work together.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to put aside

to set back
1.1
to delay; to move the time back
Today's meeting has been set back to 4pm.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to put back

to set down
1.1
to place or put on a surface or the ground
Set down your bag and give me a hug.
Syntax: separable

to set off
1.1
to make something explode; to cause something to happen
The budget cuts have set off demonstrations in the streets.
Syntax: separable

to set off \ out \ forth
1.1
to leave; to start a journey
What time are you setting off?
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to start off/out

to set up
1.1
to mount or install; to prepare
They are busy setting up the exhibition at the moment.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to trick or deceive
You set me up! You knew it wouldn't work.
Syntax: separable

to settle down
1.1
to become calm
The kids need to settle down before we go out.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to calm down

to settle down \ in
1.1
to begin to live a fixed/stable life
It's time you got a job and settled down.
Syntax: intransitive

to settle for
1.1
to accept what is available, regardless of satisfaction
They didn't have the model I wanted in blue, so I settled for the red one.
Syntax: inseparable

to settle on \ upon
1.1
to decide or agree
We couldn't agree, so we settled on an alternative.
Syntax: inseparable

to settle up
1.1
to pay a bill or a debt
One last drink and then I will settle up, ok?
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to square up

to shake off
1.1
to get rid of; to free oneself of
I can't shake off this feeling that there is something wrong with him.
Syntax: separable

to shake up
1.1
to upset someone
The accident really shook her up.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to make major changes or reorganize
There has been a big shake up at work. I just hope I still have a job!
Syntax: separable

to shape up
1.1
to develop; to take form
The business plan is shaping up nicely.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to improve
If you don't shape up, your father and I are not going to buy you that car you want.
Syntax: intransitive

to shoot down
1.1
to put an end to; to disappoint
My boss shot my idea down at the meeting today.
Syntax: separable

to shoot for
1.1
to aspire or aim to do something; to have a goal
I'm shooting for a high mark on my entrance exam.
Syntax: inseparable
US/UK: US

to shoot up
1.1
to increase rapidly
Prices have shot up since last year.
Syntax: intransitive

to show off
1.1
to behave in a way as to attract attention; to brag
Stop showing off already! It's been over a month since you won the championship.
Syntax: intransitive

to show through
1.1
to be transparent; to be evident despite attempting to conceal
She tried to hide her feelings of sadness, but they showed through anyways.
Syntax: intransitive

to show up
1.1
to arrive or appear
What time did he finally show up?
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to turn up

1.2
to embarrass someone
Stop trying to show up your sister. You both did very well this year in school.
Syntax: separable

to shut down
1.1
to close a business
The factory will be shut down next week.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to close down

to shut off \ down
1.1
to close; to cease or stop
Please shut off the lights when you leave.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to turn off; to switch off; to cut off

to shut out (of)
1.1
to exclude
Don't shut him out, I think he has a lot to contribute.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to block out

to shut up
1.1
to stop talking or making noise
Shut up already! You're giving me a headache.
Syntax: separable

to sign in
1.1
to open and start a computer program; to register
When you sign in you must give your password.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to log in
Antonyms: to sign out; to log out

to sign out
1.1
to close a computer program
I forgot to sign out of my email.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to log out
Antonyms: to sign in; to log in

to sign up \ on
1.1
agree to participate or subscribe
I signed up for the class as soon as I could.
Syntax: intransitive

to sink in
1.1
to absorb; to come to understand something
The fact that she's gone still hasn't sunk in.
Syntax: intransitive

to sink into
1.1
to fall or become immersed in something
It didn't take long for her to sink into a deep sleep.
Syntax: inseparable

to sit down
1.1
to sit or take a seat
Sit down and let's talk.
Syntax: inseparable

to sit out
1.1
to not participate or to not take part
I'm going to sit this game out, I am exhausted.
Syntax: separable

to sit up
1.1
to rise from a lying position to a seated one or to sit straight
My infant son sat up for the first time on his own yesterday.
Syntax: inseparable

to sleep off
1.1
to sleep in order to recover from something
The best cure for a hangover is to sleep it off.
Syntax: separable

to sleep over
1.1
to spend the night at someone's house
My best friend is sleeping over tonight.
Syntax: intransitive

to slip by \ away
1.1
to pass rapidly
Our vacation slipped by too quickly.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to lose an opportunity
It's a fantastic opportunity. You simply can't let it slip away!
Syntax: intransitive

to slip up
1.1
to make a mistake or an error
I'm so sorry but I slipped up and mentioned the party to Jenny.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to screw up

to slow down \ up
1.1
to reduce speed
Slow down please, you are driving too fast!
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to speed up

to speed up
1.1
to accelerate; to increase speed
I need you to speed things up, we are losing time!
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to slow down/up

to spin off
1.1
to separate
We have spun off a new brand of our children's clothes.
Syntax: separable

to split up
1.1
to divide or separate into groups
The teacher split us up into groups for the project.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to divide up

1.2
to end a relationship
Did you hear? Sally and Dave split up last week.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to break up

to stand back
1.1
to keep one's distance from something
Stand back when I light the BBQ.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to get back; to step back

to stand by
1.1
to be ready and waiting
We are standing by and waiting for instructions from the captain.
Syntax: intransitive

to stand for
1.1
to tolerate or accept
How can you stand for that kind of treatment?
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to mean, particularly in reference to initials
What does IBM stand for?
Syntax: inseparable

to stand in (for)
1.1
to substitute
I couldn't make it to the rehearsal so Bob is standing in for me.
Syntax: inseparable

to stand out
1.1
to be so extraordinary or different as to draw attention
With her blue hair, Mary really stands out in a crowd.
Syntax: intransitive

to stand up
1.1
to move to a vertical position
She stood up and walked out of the restaurant.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to fail to keep an appointment
I can't believe he stood you up!
Syntax: separable

to stand up for
1.1
to defend or support
How can you let him treat you that way? You must stand up for yourself!
Syntax: inseparable

to stand up to
1.1
to resist
My son stood up to the school bully yesterday.
Syntax: inseparable

to step up
1.1
to increase
The police stepped up security for the demonstration.
Syntax: separable

to stick around
1.1
to stay
Why don't you stick around and we'll talk.
Syntax: intransitive

to stick by
1.1
to support
I know you don't like it, but I am sticking by my decision.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to stand by

to stick out
1.1
to put out a part of one's body; to overhang a surface
She stuck out her thumb and waited for someone to give her a ride.
Syntax: separable

to stick to \ with
1.1
to continue
I know you're tired, but you have to stick to it. The project's almost finished.
Syntax: inseparable

to stick up for
1.1
to support or defend
Why don't you stick up for your sister when the kids tease her?
Syntax: inseparable

to stir up
1.1
to provoke
Some of the demonstrators were stirring up trouble with the police.
Syntax: separable

to stop by
1.1
to visit briefly
I'll stop by later and bring you that book.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to drop by

to stop over \ off
1.1
to take a break while on a journey
There will be a stop off in Barcelona on the way to Paris.
Syntax: intransitive

to storm off
1.1
to leave angrily
After the argument she stormed off.
Syntax: intransitive

to strike off \ out
1.1
to start doing something different
After the company let him go, he decided to strike off in a different direction.
Syntax: intransitive

to strike up
1.1
to start
It was a long flight so I struck up a conversation with the man sitting next to me.
Syntax: inseparable

to string along
1.1
to deceive
How did he string you along for so long?
Syntax: separable

to stumble across \ on \ upon
1.1
to find something by accident, without looking
Check out this article I stumbled on in the local newspaper.
Syntax: inseparable

to sum up
1.1
to summarize
To sum up, I would recommend stronger measures in the fight against climate change.
Syntax: separable

to switch off
1.1
to disconnect or terminate power to
Please switch off the lights when you leave.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to shut off; to turn off
Antonyms: to switch on; to turn on

to switch on
1.1
to give power to
Switch on the lights please, I can't see anything.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to turn on
Antonyms: to switch off; to shut off; to turn off

to tag along
1.1
to accompany
We are going to the beach, do you want to tag along?
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to come along

to tag on
1.1
to add
They tagged on an additional 5% for their commission.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to add on; to tack on

to take after
1.1
to look like or resemble
My son takes after his father.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to look like

to take apart
1.1
to disassemble or deconstruct; to take to pieces
The mechanic had to take apart the whole engine to determine the problem.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to put together

to take away
1.1
to remove
My parents took away my mobile because I came home late on Saturday.
Syntax: separable

to take back
1.1
to return; to retract something said or admit that it was wrong
When do you have to take the books back to the library?
Syntax: separable

1.2
to make someone remember a time in the past
This song always takes me back to my university years.
Syntax: separable

to take down
1.1
to remove; to dismount
We are taking down the exhibition next week.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to put up

1.2
to make note or write something
Take down my phone number just in case.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to jot down; to note down; to write down

to take in
1.1
to assume care
The dog looked abandoned so we took it in.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to absorb; to come to understand something
Slow down, this is a lot to take in all at once!
Syntax: separable

to take off
1.1
to depart or when the plane leaves the ground
The plane will take off in 5 minutes.
Syntax: intransitive

1.2
to remove
Take off your jacket and stay awhile.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to put on; to keep on

1.3
to make quick and good progress
The new campaign has really taken off.
Syntax: intransitive

to take on
1.1
to assume
Of course he's exhausted. He's always taking too much on.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to hire or employ
The restaurant will take on four more waiters for the high season.
Syntax: separable

to take out
1.1
to remove or extract
Can you please take out the trash when you leave?
Syntax: separable

to take over
1.1
to assume responsibility or control of an organization
The company will be taken over by a multinational next year.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to buy out

1.2
to substitute or assume a position that someone had before
She couldn't complete her term so they found a new girl to take over.
Syntax: inseparable

to take through
1.1
to explain
Come by this afternoon and I'll take you through the plans.
Syntax: separable

to take to
1.1
to begin to like something
She took to skiing after the very first day.
Syntax: inseparable

to take up
1.1
to fill or occupy space or time
The table takes up too much space in the kitchen so we moved it to the dining room.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to begin a new pastime or hobby
I have taken up yoga.
Syntax: separable

to take up on
1.1
to accept
I think I will take you up on your offer.
Syntax: separable

to talk back
1.1
to respond in a negative or rude manner
Don't talk back to me or you will go to your room for the rest of the day!
Syntax: intransitive

to talk down to
1.1
to speak to someone as if they were stupid
Don't talk down to me, I'm not an idiot!
Syntax: inseparable

to talk into
1.1
to convince or persuade someone to do something
I didn't want to go, but my sister talked me into it.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to talk out of

to talk out of
1.1
to convince or persuade someone not to do something
I was ready to quit, but my husband talked me out of it.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to talk into

to talk up
1.1
to make something or someone appear more important
If you want to sell, you have to talk up the products.
Syntax: separable

to team up
1.1
to work in a group
We teamed up in order to finish the project on time.
Syntax: intransitive

to tear apart \ up
1.1
to rip into pieces or destroy
He tore up the draft and started again.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to rip up; to rip apart

to tear away
1.1
to separate
The movie was so engaging, I couldn't tear myself away.
Syntax: separable

to tear down
1.1
to demolish or destroy
They are tearing down the mall to build an even bigger one.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to pull down

to tear into
1.1
to attack or criticize strongly
My parents tore into me the minute I walked in the door.
Syntax: inseparable

to tell off
1.1
to yell at, scold or speak angrily at someone for something they did wrong
She told him off after he was late again.
Syntax: separable

to tell on
1.1
to inform on; to report someone to an authority for having done something wrong
My brother is always telling on me to my parents.
Syntax: inseparable

to test out
1.1
to try; to test
Let's go for a drive, I want to test out the new car.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to try out

to think ahead
1.1
to plan
I was thinking ahead and bought some extra food, just in case.
Syntax: separable

to think back
1.1
to remember
I was just thinking back to that day when we first met.
Syntax: inseparable

to think over \ through
1.1
to reflex and consider something carefully
Best to think it over before you make a decision.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to mull over

to think up
1.1
to invent, create or devise
We must think up an excuse for why we are late.
Syntax: separable

to throw away \ out
1.1
to discard
Don't throw that away, it might be useful later.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to get rid of

to throw in
1.1
to include or add something
I bought a new computer yesterday and they threw in a free printer.
Syntax: separable

to throw out
1.1
to expel
They should throw that guy out, he's really drunk.
Syntax: separable

to throw together
1.1
to make or arrange something quickly, in the moment; to improvise
They will be here soon, we're going to have to just throw something together.
Syntax: separable

to throw up
1.1
to vomit
She was so drunk she threw up.
Syntax: separable

to tick off
1.1
to annoy or bother; to make someone angry
His behavior really ticked me off.
Syntax: separable

to tidy up
1.1
to clean and organize; to put things in their place
You cannot go out with your friends until you tidy up your room.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to clean up; to clear up

to tie in with
1.1
to coincide; to associate or relate; to be in accord
All of the events are meant to tie in with the anniversary.
Syntax: inseparable

to tip off
1.1
to inform; to warn
The police were tipped off by a witness to the robbery.
Syntax: separable

to tip over
1.1
to spill or overturn
If you're not careful, that's going to tip over.
Syntax: separable

to tone down
1.1
to smooth or moderate; to soften
It's a good letter, but you might want to tone it down a bit. You don't want to upset him.
Syntax: separable

to top out
1.1
to stop increasing; to reach the highest point
Your salary will top out after 5 years.
Syntax: intransitive

to top up
1.1
to fill or refill
I will top up the gas tank on my way home.
Syntax: separable

to toss about \ around
1.1
to consider
We tossed around a few ideas, but we didn't make any decisions.
Syntax: separable

to toss back \ down
1.1
to drink quickly
He tossed back two beers and left the bar.
Syntax: separable

to touch down
1.1
to land (airplane)
The plane just touched down.
Syntax: intransitive

to touch off
1.1
to provoke
The court's decision touched off demonstrations in the street.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to set off

to touch on \ upon
1.1
to mention; to speak briefly about something
He only touched on the opposition's argument.
Syntax: inseparable

to touch up
1.1
to improve the appearance of something
Can you touch up the image a little before we publish it?
Syntax: separable

to toy with
1.1
to play with
Stop toying with that button, you are going to break it.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to contemplate or consider
I have been toying with the idea of moving for awhile now.
Syntax: inseparable

to try on
1.1
to put on clothing to see how it looks and how it fits
Would you like to try those on?
Syntax: separable

to try out
1.1
to test
We are trying out some new marketing materials.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to test out

to try out for
1.1
to be tested for entrance or participation
Our son is trying out for the football team this afternoon.
Syntax: inseparable
US/UK: US

to tune out
1.1
to ignore or not pay attention to
It's so hard to tune him out. He never stops talking!
Syntax: separable

to turn against \ on
1.1
to stop liking or supporting
His long time assistant turned against him.
Syntax: inseparable

to turn around
1.1
to change, generally for the better
It was a difficult year, but things are starting to turn around.
Syntax: inseparable

to turn away
1.1
to not allow entrance
The club was full so they turned us away.
Syntax: separable

to turn back
1.1
to return
We had only walked a few blocks when it started to rain so we had to turn back.
Syntax: inseparable

to turn down
1.1
to reject or not accept
It was a great offer, but I had to turn it down.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to lower the volume or the temperature
Please turn down the volume, I'm working.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to turn up

to turn in
1.1
to submit
All projects must be turned in by the end of the week.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to hand in; to give in

to turn into
1.1
to become; to convert; to transform
What started as a nice day has turned into a disaster!
Syntax: inseparable

to turn off
1.1
to leave
He was lost. His mistake was turning off the path.
Syntax: inseparable

1.2
to cause dislike or displeasure
He was always drunk. It really turned me off.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to turn on

to turn off \ out
1.1
to stop; to disconnect; to cut power
I forgot to turn off the lights.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to turn on; to switch on; to put on
Antonyms: to switch off; to shut off

to turn on
1.1
to start; to connect
Remind me to turn on the washing machine before we leave.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to turn off; to switch off; to shut off

1.2
to excite; to cause someone to feel pleasure; to become interested
Just his voz turns me on.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to turn off

to turn out
1.1
to result
How did the dinner turn out?
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to end up

1.2
to attend
The whole town turned out for the festivities.
Syntax: inseparable

1.3
to produce
The factory turned out hundreds of thousands of cars before they had to close due to the crisis.
Syntax: separable

to turn over
1.1
to invert
Turn the page over and you will see the image I told you about.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to cycle; to change
The company is always turning over the staff.
Syntax: inseparable

1.3
to transfer or surrender
The owner is turning over the keys to us next week.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to hand over

to turn to
1.1
to get help from someone
You're the only person I can turn to.
Syntax: inseparable
Sinonyms: to look to

to turn up
1.1
to increase the volume, temperature, etc.
Turn it up! I love this song!
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to turn down

1.2
to appear
I didn't think you would turn up here after what happened last week.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to show up

to wait on
1.1
to serve or to attend to someone
Have you been waited on yet?
Syntax: inseparable

to wake up
1.1
to stop sleeping; to wake
What time do you usually wake up in the morning?
Syntax: separable

to wash up
1.1
to clean plates and utensils used for preparing and eating food
It's your turn to do the washing up.
Syntax: separable

to watch out (for)
1.1
to be careful
Watch out! The floor is wet.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to look out (for)

to watch over
1.1
to keep an eye on; to superintend
Are you free on Saturday? I need someone to watch over the kids for a couple of hours.
Syntax: inseparable

to water down
1.1
to make something weaker, less effective
Congress watered down the bill so as to make it almost completely ineffective.
Syntax: separable

to wear away \ down \ out
1.1
to erode
Driving like that, you are going to wear away the brakes.
Syntax: separable

to wear off
1.1
to disappear or to stop having an effect
I think those pills you gave me this morning are starting to wear off.
Syntax: intransitive

to wear out
1.1
to exhaust; to tire
I need a vacation. The kids are wearing me out!
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to tire out; to use up

to win over
1.1
to persuade or gain the support/consent of someone
At first I didn't agree, but he eventually won me over.
Syntax: separable

to wind down
1.1
to relax
I like to wind down at the end of the day with a glass of wine.
Syntax: intransitive
Antonyms: to wind up

1.2
to slow
It's the last day of the holiday and the festivities are winding down.
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to wind up

to wind up
1.1
to come to and end
If you are not careful you are going to wind up tired and alone.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to end up; to finish up

1.2
to provoke or increase someone's level of stress
Stop winding up your sister!
Syntax: separable
Antonyms: to wind down

to wipe out
1.1
to eradicate; to eliminate
The black plague wiped out large portions of the population.
Syntax: separable

1.2
to exhaust; to make someone very tired
This work schedule is wiping me out.
Syntax: separable

to work out
1.1
to end well
It was a difficult conversation, but everything worked out.
Syntax: intransitive
Sinonyms: to turn out

1.2
to do exercise
You look great! Have you been working out?
Syntax: inseparable

1.3
to calculate and find a solution or answer
We are trying to work out how they did it.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to figure out; to sort out

to work up
1.1
to provoke or make nervous
Stop working up your brother!
Syntax: separable

to wrap up
1.1
to end or finish
It's getting late, we better wrap things up.
Syntax: separable

to write down
1.1
to make notes
I forgot to write down his phone number.
Syntax: separable
Sinonyms: to note down

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