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Lesson 11.1

So vs. Such

Tan vs. tal
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“So” and “such” are used to add emphasis, to show extreme emotions or to give an opinion on something. The difference between the two is in their use within the structure of the sentence.

So

so + adjective/adverb

We use “so” with adjectives and adverbs to show emotions or extreme effects. In these instances, the adjective or adverb is found directly after “so” in the sentence.

Examples:

 I have been working since 7 this morning. I’m so tired!
 Why are you driving so fast?
 Kate is so beautiful. I can’t believe she’s single!
 My daughter studied so hard for her exam.

so + quantifier [many/few, much/little] + noun

“So” can be used with quantifiers to indicate extremes in quantity, but it is important to remember the rules regarding the uses of quantifiers, countable and uncountable nouns, singulars and plurals. See the lesson on quantifiers for more information. These are the only cases in which “so” is used with a noun.

“So” can be used with quantifiers to indicate extremes in quantity, but it is important to remember the rules regarding the uses of quantifiers, countable and uncountable nouns, singulars and plurals. See the lesson on quantifiers for more information. These are the only cases in which “so” is used with a noun.

Examples:

 Teresa has so many talents!
 With three kids and a full-time job, my sister has so little free time.
 I have so few memories of my childhood.
 The children watch so much television.

so + that

We use “so” with “that”, to show results or consequences. In general, the use of “that” is optional.

Examples:

 The music was so loud that I couldn’t hear my own voice.
 He was driving so fast that he had an accident.
 My son studied so hard that he received the best grade in the class.

Such

such + adjective + noun

As with “so”, we use “such” with adjectives to show extremes, but as opposed to “so”, “such” is followed by an adjective as well as a noun.

Examples:

 I am so lucky. I have such wonderful friends!
 That is such a pretty dress! You should wear it more often.
 It is such a beautiful day!

Note:Such” cannot be used with quantifiers such as “much”, “many”, “few”, o “little”. Only “so” can be used with these quantifiers.

such + that

As with “so”, “such” is used with “that” to show extremes that end in a particular result. In these cases, as with “so”, the use of “that” is optional.

Examples:

 It was such a beautiful day that we decided to go to the beach.
 Dave has such a small car that he doesn’t have to spend much money on gas.
 It was such a good meal that we made it again the next night.

such + judgmental noun

With judgmental nouns, the use of “such” gives emphasis.

Examples:

 I have never liked Andy. He is such a jerk!
 You are such a clown! Are you ever serious?

such + noun

When “such” is followed directly by a noun, “such” means “a type of”.

Examples:

 I have never seen such architecture before.
 We very rarely listen to such music.
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