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Lesson 9.3

To Get

To Get
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The verb “to get” is perhaps the most commonly used verb in spoken English. With many meanings, it is also perhaps the most difficult to learn. Below is a list of the most common meanings and uses of this verb.

Note: “To get” is an irregular verb. The past tense, as well as the past participle, is “got”.

“To get” + Direct Object

To Receive

Examples:

 Did you get my email yesterday?
 I got my drivers license in the mail this morning.

To Obtain

Examples:

 Peter got his Master’s degree from Boston University in 2005.
 We got permission to build the extension on our house.

To Buy

Examples:

 Can you get some milk while you are at the supermarket?
 Carrie is getting a new car next week.

To Earn/Charge

Examples:

 How much do you think I can get for my old car?
 I get overtime pay when I work more than 8 hours a day.

To Fetch

Examples:

 Can you get my jacket for me?
 She got a cup of coffee and sat down to talk.

“To get” + Expression of Place

To Arrive

When we use the verb “to get” to mean “to arrive”, the preposition of direction or movement, “to” is necessary.

Examples:

 What time do you get to work in the mornings?
 Greg didn’t get to the party until 11 o’clock.

To Reach

Example:

 Oliver can you help me? I can’t get the book, the shelf is too high.

“To get” + Adjective

To become

In this sense, “to get” indicates a process or change of state.

Examples:

 Don’t get angry, I was just joking!
 We better go inside, it’s getting dark.
 Winter is almost here, it’s getting colder every day.
 I’m getting tired, I think I will go to bed.
 I heard you are sick. I hope you get better soon.
 Brad jumped out of bed and got dressed quickly because he was late for work.
 When did you get married?

“To get” + Preposition or Adverb

There are many phrasal verbs which use the verb “to get”; below is a list of the most common.

To get on/in

Meaning: to enter. We use “to get on” with buses, trains, and planes, but “to get in” with cars and houses.

Examples:

 Where do you get on the train? “The Broadway/Lafayette stop.”
 The flight was delayed. We didn’t even get on the plane until 11:30.
 Get in the the house, it’s raining!
 She got in the car and immediately started crying.

To get off/out of

Meaning: to exit. We use “to get off” with buses, trains and planes, but “to get out of” with cars, houses and rooms.

Examples:

 We have to get off the bus at the next stop.
 John got off the plane at 6 o’clock.
 Get out of my room immediately!
 She got out of the car and slammed the door.

To get by

Meaning: to survive; to have just enough money

Examples:

 How are you getting by right now without a job?
 We can’t get by on just one salary.

To get over"

Meaning: to recover, physically or emotionally

Examples:

 Alice still hasn’t gotten over her ex-boyfriend.
 Has your mother gotten over the flu yet?

To get up

Meaning: to get out of bed

Examples:

 The children get up at 7 o’clock every morning.
 I didn’t get up until 11 o’clock this morning.

Other Uses of “To get”

To Understand

Examples:

 I don’t get it, can you repeat what you just said?
 Henry didn’t get the joke and so was the only one not laughing.

To Persuade

Examples:

 I tried to get Jane to come to the party, but she just wouldn’t be convinced.
 Can I get you to change your mind?
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